Vol. 117 No. 3

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NEW ADDITIONS TO THE HUMANIST LIBRARY Cathy Broad

MORAL THEORY FOR NATURALISTS Catherine Wilson
Moral practices are viewed from a naturalistic and evolutionary perspective, which includes looking at the sub-human as well as the human. Generally, growth in moral outlook is growth in concern for, and empathy with, other people: it means becoming more humane. But this process requires an increase in factual information as well as emotional development. Abstract by Tom Rubens.

EXISTENTIALISM, ATHEISM AND HUMANISM Gary Cox
A remarkably concise account of the main features of both religious and atheistic existentialism. On the former, Kierkegaard is the main figure examined: like all existentialists, he saw action as of primary importance, but regarded it as being based on religious faith, which had to be maintained in the face of doubts, challenges and adversity. However, for atheistic existentialists, such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre and Camus, religious faith is not a factor. Among their many arguments for the non-existence of deity is that the human being would not be something indeterminate and free–as they, along with Kierkegaard, claim s/he is–if created by a deity, under conditions in which deity had a fixed and determinate concept of what was to be made. Atheistic existentialists by no means take the idea of deity lightly, but they do insist that the idea is now of no value in making life meaningful. Meaning can only come from the action-choices of human beings. Abstract by Tom Rubens.

VIEWPOINTS: Terry Liddle, Chris Purnell, Beatie Feder

AMERICAN BANKS AND BRITISH BUILDING SOCIETIES Peter Griffiths
A brief account of the many financial troubles which American banks and British building societies have suffered since 2007.

BOOK REVIEWS: Norman Bacrac, Jim Herrick, Jennifer R. Jeynes

CONWAY’S RADICAL THOUGHTS IN AMERICA William B. Jensen
This briefly outlines the main stages in the evolution of Conway’s thought: his championing of abolitionism, his rejection of supernaturalism, and his growing interest in Tom Paine. Also mentioned is Conway’s radical view that the notion of free will is incompatible with the view that the universe was created and is governed by a perfect deity.

ETHICAL SOCIETY EVENTS

 

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