Vol. 120 No. 4 (April 2015)

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SARTRE AND THE ANGUISH OF FREEDOM Jane O’Grady

Sartre argues that human beings possess absolute free will to act, whatever the pressures of circumstance may be. However, this freedom is not some kind of luxury, but a harsh task-master throughout life. We posses it because we have no ‘essence’ i.e. we begin our existence as a form of‘nothingness,’ a lack, and our constant tendency is to try and replace this nothingness with ‘something-ness,’ and to do so through our actions. Because, then, we begin as nothing, nothing can determine or cause our subsequent actions–hence these are free. Also, it is our actions which create our moral values, as there is no God to create them. Further, since these values do not emanate from anything outside the human sphere, they are not objective, in the sense of being objects of discovery. Thus, adhering to them while knowing they can never be objective is what produces a sense of anguish. Abstract by Tom Rubens.

CONWAY HALL SUNDAY CONCERT REPORT Giles Enders

VIEWPOINTS C. Purnell, R. Ward, C. Mills, S. Mayer, T.Rubens, D. Miller, R. McLeod

PUZZLING BODY PHENOMENA Filiz Peach

A highly varied exploration of our experiences of our bodies; it focuses on the writings of Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean-Paul Sartre. For these and other existentialist philosophers, there is no basic distinction between mind and body: rather, the body is seen, not as an object external to consciousness but as an entity entwined with consciousness. Hence it is viewed as a body-subject, because always related to our subjectivity. Abstract by Tom Rubens.

BRITAIN’S HEAD OF STATE SHOULD BE ELECTED Jennifer R. Jeynes

THE ETHICAL SOCIETY’S FUTURE– DIRECTION OR DRIFT? John Dowdle

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